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Pasteurized Eggs

Eggs that have been exposed to heat in order to destroy potential bacteria. Due to the heat process, pasteurized eggs may have slightly lower amounts of heat-sensitive vitamins, such as riboflavin, thiamin and folic acid.

Along with updating recipes to cook them properly – using pasteurized egg products and shell eggs is an option for safely preparing recipes calling for raw or undercooked eggs. Although the rate of egg contamination with Salmonella bacteria is only about 1 in 20,000 eggs, it’s best to choose one of these options when you make raw or only partially cooked recipes – especially when you serve the very young, the elderly, pregnant women or anyone whose immune system is impaired.

Pasteurized shell eggs are especially suitable for preparing egg recipes that aren’t fully cooked, but you can also use them for other recipes, including baked goods. The heating process may create cloudiness in the whites and increase the time you need to beat the whites for foam formation. Allow up to about four times as much time for full foam formation to occur in pasteurized egg whites as you would for the whites of regular eggs. Prepare other recipes as usual.

Pasteurized shell eggs must be kept refrigerated. You can store them for at least 30 days from the pack date.

 
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