Eggs 101

 

Where do your eggs come from?

Many Americans never learned how eggs end up in grocery stores, where chickens live, how egg farmers care for their hens or what egg farmers do to protect the land, air and water around their farms. A lot happens before eggs are sold, and understanding responsible farming practices used on today’s modern egg farms educates both today and tomorrow’s consumers.

Eggs 101 is a series of short videos telling the story of how eggs travel from the hen house to our plates. The videos are intended for 4th to 8th-grade level classroom use. Each video gives an in-depth explanation of a segment of an egg’s journey, beginning with the barn experience and environmental management, and ending with the egg itself as it arrives in homes nationwide.

We have created an Eggs 101 teacher’s guide for these videos which includes quizzes, lesson plans, and activities that supports national learning standards in science and social studies.

 

Download the teacher’s guide here

Video review quizzes for students appear after each video.

 

For Economics lessons on eggs, go here.

 
 

EGGS 101 VIDEOS

 

Overview

A brief explanation of the laying, cleaning, and packaging steps for eggs prior to reaching homes nationwide.

 

BARNS

Hen houses have greatly evolved over time and are still evolving today. There are many different styles of barns, but each designed to keep hens safe and healthy.

 

HEN HEALTH

It is important to keep things out of the barn that can make hens sick. Egg farmers place high importance on biosecurity and require farm workers and visitors to follow strict rules when entering the farm.

 

HENS

There are many different species of hens, but each have a similar lifestyle and produce eggs with the same genetic make-up and nutritional value.

 

HENS: THE MAKING OF AN EGG

A hen’s biological makeup is what allows her to produce many eggs in her lifetime.

 

EGGS PART 1

Hens in the United States produce up to 75 Billion eggs per year. Eggs can vary in size, but each contains the same three parts and contain an abundance of nutrients.

 

 

 

EGGS PART 2

Eggs go through many different steps during the few days prior to reaching the grocery store to ensure they’re safe. Consumers also play an important role in safe egg handling practices.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

Egg farmers work hard to recycle resources used in their barns. Over the past fifty years, egg farmers have been able to greatly reduce their environmental footprint by following strict environmental management guidelines.

MyPlate Activity

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • Describe the five food groups on MyPlate.
  • Build a balanced breakfast with at least three out of the five food groups from MyPlate.
  • Describe different examples of a balanced breakfast.
  • Explain the benefits of eating a healthy balanced breakfast.

MyPlate

This lesson centers on the MyPlate Plan – from the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, which encourages people to find a healthy eating style by eating meals made from the five food groups—fruits, vegetables, dairy, proteins and grains.

MyPlate depicts a place setting with a plate and glass divided into five food groups.

 

Benefits of Breakfast

Numerous research studies show that students who eat breakfast—either at school or home—have better academic performance and behavior.1 When children eat better, they learn better. A well-balanced breakfast, rich in protein, whole grains, fruits/vegetables and low-fat/fat-free milk gives children the energy they need to learn and stay active. Breakfast options that include eggs present opportunities to include other nutrient-dense foods encouraged by the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, such as vegetables and whole grains. Egg consumption by American children and adolescents is associated with intake of several nutrients, including higher protein, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated and total fat, α-linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, choline, lutein + zeaxanthin, vitamin D, potassium, phosphorus, and selenium.2

 

Classroom MyPlate Activity

 

Materials Needed:

1 Large basket, bucket or another vessel

Cards depicting five food groups

OPTIONAL: Print out MyPlate Pick3 breakfast and lunch posters as visual aids on our Tools for Schools page

 

Lesson Preparation:

Print an equal number of place settings of cards (5), so there is one food group card for each student. Optimally, total number of students is divisible by five. If not, some students may have to represent more than one food group. Cut each sheet into five cards.

Each MyPlate card set includes the following groups/colors:
Vegetables/green
Fruits/red
Dairy/blue
Proteins/purple
Grains/orange

Place food group cards in basket/bucket, ensuring there are enough for each student to get at least one. Mix them together.

Grade level: 2nd and 3rd
Estimated time: 15 minutes

 

Instructions

1)  Ask students if they can name the five food groups. Once all the food groups are identified, ask the students to name some foods that fit into each group.

    • Fruits
      Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.
    • Vegetables
      Any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the Vegetable Group. Vegetables may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut-up, or mashed.
    • Dairy
      All fluid milk products and many foods made from milk are considered part of this food group. Foods made from milk that retain their calcium content are part of the group. Foods made from milk that have little to no calcium, such as cream cheese, cream, and butter, are not. Calcium-fortified soymilk (soy beverage) is also part of the Dairy Group.
    • Proteins
      All foods made from eggs, meat, poultry, seafood, beans and peas, processed soy products, nuts and seeds are considered part of the Protein Group.
    • Grains
      Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas, and grits are examples of grain products. Grains are divided into 2 subgroups, Whole Grains and Refined Grains

2) Introduce MyPlate briefly, and the importance of a balanced meal, including the different food groups—especially protein, like eggs. (MyPlate posters can be a good visual aid.)

 

3) Next, have students pull one food group card from the basket. Once everyone has a card, have the students form groups of five—each student in a group must have a different color/food group card. (If the number of students is not divisible by five, either have the extra students double up in one of the other groups or give the smaller group the extra cards needed to cover all five food groups.)

 

4) When students are in groups, have them share which food group they have—whether it’s protein, grain, fruit, veggies or dairy. Then ask them to create a well-balanced breakfast plate with at least three out of the five food group cards. Students can suggest foods for a meal from the food group(s) they represent.

 

5) Finish with final thoughts on MyPlate.

    • Emphasize how eating a balanced breakfast can help them grow and learn better.
    • Eating breakfast gives them energy.
    • High-quality protein options, like eggs, are important to help them stay full, so they can focus on their schoolwork.
    • Did you know? Eggs have protein and important nutrients that help you stay focused in school!
    • Eggs can be eaten any time for breakfast, lunch, dinner or snacks.

Suggested Companion Resources

MyPlate Graphic
https://www.choosemyplate.gov/resources/myplate-graphic-resources

Educational Handouts For Parents
Eat Better. Learn Better. with School Breakfast

Eggucational Fun & Games For The Classroom
Egg Nutrition Memory Card Game

  1. Food Research & Action Center, Research Brief: Breakfast for Learning. This brief was originally prepared in September 2011 and updated in the spring of 2014 by FRAC’s Madeleine Levin, MPH, Senior Policy Analyst. This brief was updated again in October 2016 by FRAC’s Heather Hartline-Grafton, DrPH, RD, Senior Nutrition Policy and Research Analyst.

  2. Papanikolaou, Y. and V.L. Fulgoni, 3rd, Egg Consumption in U.S. Children is Associated with Greater Daily Nutrient Intakes, including Protein, Lutein + Zeaxanthin, Choline, alpha-Linolenic Acid, and Docosahexaenoic Acid. Nutrients, 2019. 11(5).

Egg Nutrition Memory Game

The Memory Game is a fun game that most students already know how to play. And if not, it’s easy to learn. This Egg Nutrition Memory Game version adds an extra layer of learning, explaining the nutritional benefits of eggs.

 

Build a Deck

To build your own deck of Egg Nutrition Memory Cards, download the design files (.jpg) and send to a professional printer or download the attached 8.5 x 11″ file (.pdf) and print two copies on your own printer using Avery postcards #3380.

Please note: The cards are double-sided, and for a single deck, you will need to print two copies of each of the seven game cards.

Memory Game Instructions

 

First, ask students to raise their hand if they’ve ever played a memory card game before.

Ask one of the students ‘in the know’ to explain to the rest of the class how to play.

If no one knows how to play, tell them it’s a matching game wherein all the cards are shuffled and then laid face down, side by side. Each person takes a turn to try and match until all the cards are matched. The one with the most matches at the end wins.

 

Then explain:

The cards in this memory game will explain to you why eggs are nutritious. As you play, make sure to read the cards, so you’ll be ready to tell us why eggs can be good for us and our bodies.

Once you’ve made all the matches, you can play again, if there’s still time.

In 10 minutes, we’ll stop playing to see what you learned about eggs from reading the cards.

 

Ask: Can anyone tell me something they learned about Eggs?

Answers:
Support…
Eyes
Bones
Muscles
Brain
Keep your tummy full longer

 

Ask: And what did you learn about breakfast?

Answers:
Gives you energy
Helps you learn better

  1. National Cancer Institute. Usual dietary intakes: food intakes, US population, 2007–10. Available at http://appliedresearch.cancer.gov/diet/usualintakes/pop/2007-10

  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5391775/

  3. Sievenpiper JL, Kendall CWC, et al. Effect of non-oil-seed pulses on glycaemic control: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled experimental trials in people with and without diabetes. Diabetologia.2009;52:1479–1495.

  4. https://www.bmj.com/content/353/bmj.i2716

  5. Fuller N, et al. Effect of a high-egg diet on cardiometabolic risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes and Egg (DIABEGG) Study—randomized weight-loss and follow-up phase. Am J Clin Nutr. 2018;107:1-11.

  6. Sabaté J, Oda K, Ros E. Nut Consumption and Blood Lipid Levels: A Pooled Analysis of 25 Intervention Trials. Arch Intern Med. 2010;170(9):821-827.

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Post-Pandemic Normal

POST-PANDEMIC NORMAL

 

What does the new normal look like for on-campus dining services? At this point it’s still evolving, and no doubt will continue to do so as colleges and universities struggle to adapt to post-pandemic higher education. For now, adjusting to the new reality of social distancing and fewer students regularly on campus, dining services operators are simplifying menu offerings to lower food and labor costs.1 At the same time, campus dining services want to offer nutritious meals because that’s what their students expect and desire – more than half of students say it’s important to eat healthy and pay attention to nutrition, according to Technomic.

One thing is certain. The new normal for on-campus dining services will be dominated by prepackaged, grab and go offerings. Tech-savvy Gen Z already had a penchant for eating on the go prior to the pandemic, so they will easily adapt to contactless ordering and paying for items that enable them to eat in their socially-distant bubbles. The key to keeping Gen Z dining on campus will be meeting their expectations for carryout options and ordering.

Opportunities for campus dining
• Offer foods that travel well and can be easily reheated if necessary.
• Use technology for worry-free contactless ordering and payment.
• Let students preorder meals.
• Promote nutritious food and beverage combinations with functional benefits like energy for study or immune health.
• Ready-to-heat meals/meal kits for off campus students/faculty/staff.

  1. Datassential C19 Report – 80% of C&U operators have narrowed their menu offerings; 96% of operators have decreased purchasing

24721

Served over ice in a tall glass, straight in a martini glass for a mocktail, or even in a plastic bottle in the retail beverage refrigerator, this aromatic creamy topped drink is refreshing any time of day.

Yield: 3 to 10 portions

Elderflower Foam Iced Tea

Elderflower Foam Iced Tea

Served over ice in a tall glass, straight in a martini glass for a mocktail, or even in a plastic bottle in the retail beverage refrigerator, this aromatic creamy topped drink is refreshing any time of day.

Yield: 3 to 10 portions

Yield:

tips

24716

Eggs baked in a bed of roasted corn, chilies and jicama

Street vendors layer smoky flavors on grilled corn when they slather it with mayonnaise or crema, roll in grated cheese, sprinkle with chopped cilantro and dust with chili-salt. Some customers add a squeeze of lime to balance the sweet corn. This batch cooked version enables the C&U community to bring the flavors of Mexico in an updated format to serve inside dining halls. Note that this uses chili powder with an “i” which is not just ground chilies (aka chile powder) but a spice mix with a blend of chile peppers and other spices, including cumin, peppercorn, oregano and salt.

Yield: 6-12 portions (one full 2-inch hotel pan)

Mexican Street Corn & Egg Bake

Mexican Street Corn & Egg Bake

Eggs baked in a bed of roasted corn, chilies and jicama

Street vendors layer smoky flavors on grilled corn when they slather it with mayonnaise or crema, roll in grated cheese, sprinkle with chopped cilantro and dust with chili-salt. Some customers add a squeeze of lime to balance the sweet corn. This batch cooked version enables the C&U community to bring the flavors of Mexico in an updated format to serve inside dining halls. Note that this uses chili powder with an “i” which is not just ground chilies (aka chile powder) but a spice mix with a blend of chile peppers and other spices, including cumin, peppercorn, oregano and salt.

Yield: 6-12 portions (one full 2-inch hotel pan)

Yield:

tips