Natalie Rizzo Egg Bowl Blog 720x274

5 Ways To Build An Egg Bowl

Nutrients in Eggs

Nutritious Dietary Patterns

 

Here’s a common dilemma I hear from many folks: You want to prepare and eat a nutritious meal, but picking out and cooking a recipe takes too much time and energy. Don’t reach for the take-out app just yet. If you’re overwhelmed with recipes, I have the ultimate solution for you– a no-recipe egg bowl formula. It’s a simple blueprint to help whip up a satisfying meal on the fly without any recipe reading. 

Here’s the simple formula to get you on your way to lunch or dinner success:

1 to 2 cups of veggies + ½ cup of whole grains + 1 large egg + 1 tablespoon sauce. 

The 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend eating 2½ cups of vegetables per day, and this egg bowl helps you meet those recommendations. Start by picking out your favorite veggie(s) and build the bowl from there. If you opt for more than one vegetable, try to eat different colors for a variety of nutrients. 

Next, add a whole grain. MyPlate recommends filling a quarter of your plate with a grain. Whole grains provide fiber and protein, two nutrients that contribute to satiety, as well as heart health and muscle growth. There are a ton of tasty and affordable whole grain options to choose from, such as brown rice, farro, oats, bulgur, barley and more. 

Your bowl already has some protein, vitamins and minerals, but top it with an egg to add even more nutrition. Eggs naturally provide many essential nutrients, such as Vitamin B12, biotin, iodine, selenium, choline, riboflavin, pantothenic acid and protein. Not to mention that they are one of the only foods that naturally have Vitamin D, which along with calcium, is critical for building strong bones. Eggs are also an important part of a plant-forward diet, especially since they aid in the absorption of nutrients found in plant foods, such as vitamin E and carotenoids. 

What’s more, eggs contain important nutrients for brain health, including choline and lutein. Choline is critical for brain development during pregnancy and infancy, but approximately 90% of pregnant women don’t get enough of this essential nutrient. Two large eggs supply more than half of the recommended intake for pregnant women and can help them meet their needs. Lutein has long been associated with eye health and emerging research shows lutein may also play a role in cognition too. 

Lastly, don’t forget to add a sauce to your egg bowl for flavor and even more nutrients. Opt for sauces made with healthy oils, vegetables, beans and/or legumes. If you need a little inspiration, make sure you check out the five simple egg bowl suggestions below.

  • Fall Harvest Egg Bowl: oven-roasted Brussels sprouts & cauliflower + wheatberries + over easy egg + balsamic vinaigrette
  • Pesto Egg Bowl: oven-roasted crispy broccoli & sun-dried tomatoes + farro + poached egg + pesto
  • Mexican Egg Bowl: fresh shredded purple cabbage & corn + brown rice + fried egg + salsa
  • Green Tahini Egg Bowl: fresh kale & shelled edamame + quinoa + sunny side up egg + tahini sauce (whisk together 1 tablespoon of tahini, a pinch of salt and a splash of water)
  • Mediterranean bowl: fresh cherry tomatoes & sliced cucumber & olives + lentils + hard boiled egg + hummus

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