Inside the Incredible Egg: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025

Episode 2: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025

Inside the Incredible Egg is a podcast produced by the American Egg Board with the purpose of keeping our producers up to date with what’s happening at the American Egg Board and in the egg industry.

In this episode, Dr. Mickey Rubin, the executive director of the Egg Nutrition Center at the American Egg Board, breaks down the role of eggs in the U.S. Dietary Guidelines.  

Click below to listen to the podcast, and scroll down to read the transcription of the episode.

Inside the Incredible Egg
Inside the Incredible Egg
Episode 2: Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2020-2025
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SAMANTHA BOAS: Welcome to Inside the Incredible Egg. Inside the Incredible Egg is a podcast produced by the American Egg Board with the purpose of keeping our producers up to date with what’s happening at the board and in the egg industry. I’m Samantha, this summer’s industry affairs and engagement intern. Today’s episode will cover the role of eggs in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans for 2020-2025. To talk about the Guidelines, I have with me Dr. Mickey Rubin, the executive director of the Egg Nutrition Center at the American Egg Board.

BOAS: What should our audience know about our efforts related to producing the Dietary Guidelines?

MICKEY RUBIN: The Dietary Guidelines are the federal nutrition policy for the U.S., and they are published by the government. It’s a team effort by the US Department of Agriculture and Departments of Health and Human Services. The process is very science based. The USDA or the HHS appoints a committee of scientific experts, mostly nutrition researchers and researchers in other health areas, who review all of the relevant science over the course of a couple of years or so. It’s a very in-depth process. And they come up with recommendations to the government on what they think should be in the guidelines. And then the government publishes the Dietary Guidelines policy shortly thereafter.

The guidelines are important because it basically sets a standard for any food and nutrition program that is overseen by the government. So, we’re talking school nutrition programs, we’re talking programs for seniors, we’re talking any program that involves nutrition at all follows the guidelines. The best examples are school nutrition, WIC and SNAP programs, and things like that all follow the Dietary Guidelines’ recommendations.

The American Egg Board Egg Nutrition Center participate in the process like any other citizen in the United States can participate in the process. It’s a public process, which means that there are opportunities throughout the two or three years that the guidelines are in development. There are opportunities to participate, either in the form of written comments submitted to the committee and to the agencies in charge of the process. Also, there are times when there’s opportunity for oral comments, so traveling to the organization and appearing in front of the committee and providing commentary that way.

We also monitor the discussions that are going on. It’s a public process, all the meetings of the Advisory Committee are public, and you can listen live online or in person. From that, we determine what science are they looking at, what science is relevant to eggs, and make sure that whatever science relevant to eggs in the areas they’re talking about is submitted to them and they are made aware of it. So, we are really tasked with monitoring discussion, understanding the high priority areas of the committee and making sure that all the relevant science related to eggs gets reviewed as part of that process.

BOAS: Given that background of how the Dietary Guidelines work, and how AEB got involved with them, what specific insights do the guidelines give regarding egg consumption?

RUBIN: I think they’ve certainly evolved over the years. So, you know, we have every five years there’s a new guideline that comes out, every five years there’s a new Advisory Committee report that comes out. And they’re really two separate documents and kind of serve two different purposes. And each time there’s different insights that we can glean from them. One of the things that I really focus on, when that Advisory Committee report comes out, they usually detail several areas that are in need of future research, that are research gaps. And so we take a look at that very closely because if those topics at all are related to eggs, then that could feed right into the Egg Nutrition Center nutrition research program. So that’s really important.

We look at how eggs are recommended for various age groups. This year, one of the nutrients that was pointed out by the Dietary Guidelines’ Advisory Committee was choline, and they basically said that nobody is getting enough choline. Nobody’s meeting recommendations. They identify choline as a nutrient that poses special challenges because hardly any age group is meeting those recommendations. But, they pointed out specifically the importance of choline during pregnancy because of the importance of choline in brain development for infants and toddlers. So, we look pretty closely at things like that. And we look to see they established the fact that choline is important during that life stage. And then we also look to see what other research is needed on that topic that might actually help us understand that area better. And that might refine the recommendations in the future on those topics.

BOAS: Were there any other topics or insights from the guidelines that specifically relate to eggs?

RUBIN: The recommendations for children from birth to two years of age, they’d never had this before. And so we were really curious about what those were going to look like. Because it’s a different area, we’re obviously talking about infants and toddlers, most of whom, up until the age of six months or so, their only diet consists of breastfeeding and formula feeding. So, what are the recommendations going to look like for when these kiddos start having real solid foods? The really fascinating insight that we learned there is that there are really fundamental first foods for this age group, and for a couple of reasons.

One was eggs, the other was seafood, and the other were nuts. And so the reason why those three were called out, one in particular that apply to all three and you might recognize, all three as potential allergens. What the research on food allergy has shown just in the last five to 10 years is that we don’t want to restrict potential allergens from children anymore, we want to introduce those allergens early. Because when we introduce those allergens early, that actually reduces the risk of developing an allergy to those foods later on. So that was pointed out as being important.

And then, in addition to that, those three foods also, they’re recognizable as also pretty healthy foods. They’re very nutrient dense, eggs are nutrient dense. So those three foods, not only important for early introduction for reducing allergy risk, but also for their nutrient density, and for the nutrients that they contain that are quite critical for brain development, as well. So, I think that to me, is probably the biggest learning from the guidelines that is related to eggs.

BOAS: Are there any new learnings that apply beyond the birth to age two age group?

RUBIN: Well, I mentioned already about choline across the lifespan. We saw some other interesting things come from the Advisory Committee. There’s not enough choline being consumed in adolescence as well. Protein is another one that I thought was really interesting. You hear a lot about protein and oh, Americans, we eat too much protein anyway, we don’t need any more protein, but it really is age specific. Adolescent girls, teenage girls are actually not meeting the recommendation. Boys are at it or above it, but we really need to look at protein from an age group-specific lens and making sure that the recommendations are catered specific to those who need them.

One other thing that I think is important to note, and this goes back to the previous guidelines in 2015. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines removed dietary cholesterol from their list of nutrients of concern. I think what’s important here in the newest guidelines, the 2020 guidelines, is that this guideline carries forward that same recommendation that dietary cholesterol is not a nutrient of public health concern, there is no limit to dietary cholesterol intake in the guidelines, similar to what was recommended in 2015.

BOAS: So based on the guidelines and what they say about eggs, how are you and the rest of the American Egg Board going to utilize that information moving forward?

RUBIN: The guidelines are sort of fundamental to almost everything we do from a health and nutrition perspective. The guidelines really serve as a great foundation for all of our messaging around nutrition and eggs in the context of healthy dietary patterns. So since eggs exist in all three healthy dietary patterns, as defined by the Dietary Guidelines, that allows us to scribe that in our messaging to health professionals who are interested in understanding the role of eggs in a healthy diet. So, it really serves as a basis for almost everything we do in our nutrition communications work.

BOAS: Based on everything we’ve talked about, is there anything else you would like to add?

RUBIN: I would just want to reinforce that the Dietary Guidelines are a critically important component of the nutrition landscape here in the U.S. As I said, they serve as the basis for all nutrition policy, and that gets translated into recommendations by health professionals. But they also serve as the basis for our work, our nutrition communications, our messaging to health professionals around the role of eggs in healthy dietary patterns. But also, I think everybody should have confidence in them that they are science-based, that the science is evaluated critically by experts who make these recommendations to the agencies that produce the guidelines. And it represents the best nutrition science that we have. And they continue to evolve as we learn more from nutrition science. The guidelines will evolve with the science.

BOAS: I’d like to give a special thanks to Dr. Rubin for taking the time to chat with me about the Dietary Guidelines. And thanks for listening to Inside the Incredible Egg.

Inside the Incredible Egg: Podcast Introduction and Summer Marketing Campaign

Episode 1: Podcast Introduction and Summer Marketing Campaign

Inside the Incredible Egg is a podcast produced by the American Egg Board with the purpose of keeping our producers up to date with what’s happening at the American Egg Board and in the egg industry.

This first episode covers our summer marketing campaign, the #EggDishChallenge. The TikTok challenge asked consumers to highlight their favorite egg dish from a local restaurant. 

Click below to listen to the podcast, and scroll down to read the transcription of the episode.

Inside the Incredible Egg
Inside the Incredible Egg
Episode 1: Podcast Introduction and Summer Marketing Campaign
/

SAMANTHA BOAS: Welcome to Inside the Incredible Egg. Inside the Incredible Egg is a podcast produced by the American Egg Board with the purpose of keeping our producers up to date with what’s happening at the board and in the egg industry. I’m Samantha, this summer’s industry affairs and engagement intern. Today’s episode will cover our summer marketing campaign, the #EggDishChallenge. To talk about this campaign, I have with me Sue Coyle, the director of integrated marketing at the American Egg Board.

BOAS: Can you tell me about the summer marketing campaign?

SUE COYLE: Sure, so it is called #EggDishChallenge. It is a TikTok program and to help American restaurants recover coming out of the pandemic where so many were hit really hard, we wanted to do a program that really strongly encouraged people to get back to the restaurants this summer. As people are coming out of lockdown from the pandemic, one of the things they missed really badly was the neighborhood restaurant spots, so we wanted to do something that really celebrated those restaurants that we love. So we created the TikTok program.

It’s called #EggDishChallenge and what it is is a team of influencers hosted or led by Chef Lovely who is a very popular TV chef. She has shows on both the Oprah Network as well as Discovery+ Network and she has filmed a video that is on TikTok at her favorite restaurant which is called Fratelli Café in Los Angeles. And in the video, she talks about her favorite egg dish which is Green Eggs and Ben which is like a spinoff of eggs benedict. She thinks it’s the best egg dish she has ever had, and she kind of calls out a challenge to other TikTokers to prove her wrong. And with that, we have 10 other food-focused TikTok influencers that are doing the same thing. They are filming their favorite dish at their favorite restaurant and then they are posting it on TikTok. Combined altogether, these influencers including Chef Lovely have over 11 million followers which is a huge amount to start a campaign with.

We are just hoping for the word to spread and for a lot of Americans to do the same and feature their favorite egg dish at their favorite neighborhood restaurants this summer. So it’s really a simple idea, but we are hoping that people feel the passion and the love and really kind of give back to their neighborhood restaurants so that they can continue to recover from the pandemic. And of course with that focus on eggs, we want them to enjoy their favorite egg dish and there are just so many different ways that people do enjoy them. And the TikTok program is bringing that to life with the videos featured on many different recipes.

BOAS: Where did the idea for the challenge come from originally?

COYLE: So in our strategic plan, we wanted to focus on restaurants and with COVID, the nature of how we’re supporting them is different than we probably would have done if COVID didn’t happen. Knowing that there’s a lot of regional food tastes across all food, internally we just discussed, wouldn’t it be interesting if we could feature lots of the different regional tastes of America through eggs. And so that’s really where it started, and we have not worked with TikTok before but we evaluated different social media options and TikTok seemed to really rise above the potential and the reach for the program and seemed really appropriate because most TikTok videos are done in very fun and entertaining ways. So we thought it would bring this nugget, this idea we had to life really well.

BOAS: How will the challenge ultimately help egg producers and the restaurants that are featured?

COYLE: Encouraging people to go back to restaurants. You know, a lot of people because they were stuck at home cooked a lot more and used a lot more eggs than usual. Now they are so happy to be let out of the house. We just want to make sure that they maybe frequent their favorite spot a little bit more often and having those daily communications through TikTok about these different egg dishes through the appetite appeal and the fun and passion that the TikTokers are showing for their restaurants. The strategy is to drive more people to restaurants to eat more egg dishes than ever. And through that, that will help our producers because with the more traffic and more consumption will be an increase in egg sales.

BOAS: With the challenge starting at the beginning of the summer, can you give an update on where the challenge is now and how the challenge is ending?

COYLE: The challenge ended on July 22 and that ended with a new custom video that Chef Lovely created for us, promoting again that America’s egg farmers are very passionate about helping restaurants get back on their feet and kind of thanking them and all the participants who created their custom TikTok videos. We had over 56 million views across all of the TikTok videos, all of the influencers plus Chef Lovely. We even had some AEB staff create their own videos, so that is a huge number. And we are now starting the fulfillment process, awarding the checks to 10 of the restaurants. In fact, we had a great event yesterday in Los Angeles. We had an opportunity to go on a local TV station, KTLA, and we had Chef Lovely and the chef from the winning Los Angeles restaurant which is named Cilantro Lime. And he cooked up his huevos rancheros and Chef Lovely talked again about America’s egg farmers and how they dedicated this program to helping restaurants and creating awareness and driving people back to the restaurant. And at the end of that little demo, we had Chris Nichols from Chino Valley Ranchers step onto the set and award Chef Leo with a $10,000 check, so that was really fun. Chef Leo was really touched and really grateful and he said that the money would really be put to good use. So, we will be continuing to fulfill those checks throughout the summer, over the next couple weeks. I’m sure that they’ll be really well-received.

BOAS: Is there anything else you want to add?

COYLE: The TikTokers that are featured in the program are across the country in certain markets and the videos and the food that they feature are so appetizing and delicious looking. I would encourage anybody to go to #EggDishChallenge and take a look because I think they would get a lot of inspiration. If they don’t live in that market, they could maybe try to make it at home or if they are going to be travelling to that market they might want to visit that restaurant.

BOAS: Thank you for listening to Inside the Incredible Egg. In our next episode, we are talking to Dr. Mickey Rubin, the executive director of the Egg Nutrition Center, about the recently released 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and what the guidelines mean for egg consumption.

American Egg Board Names Hema Prado Director of Sustainability to Lead Expansive New Industry Program

American Egg Board Names Hema Prado Director of Sustainability to Lead Expansive New Industry Program

EPA veteran to help drive egg industry sustainability, hen welfare and purpose-driven production initiatives that support producers, retailers, foodservice and manufacturers

Hema Prado(CHICAGO) July 13, 2021 The American Egg Board (AEB) has named Hema Prado to the newly created role of director of sustainability. Reporting to Dr. Mickey Rubin, executive director of the AEB’s Egg Nutrition Center, Prado will oversee development and administration of a comprehensive new sustainability program encompassing critical industry-level research and education initiatives with significant potential value to U.S. egg producers and their food industry customers.

The creation of the role and Prado’s recruitment reflect the AEB’s strategic commitment to serve as a partner and resource on sustainability, hen care and other corporate social responsibility issues of importance to egg industry customers. Prado brings twenty years of experience and passion for environmental, agricultural and health issues spanning government, nonprofits and the private sector, notably including her most recent positions with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She has built and led initiatives with broad and diverse stakeholders by focusing on strategic approaches, problem-solving and innovation.

“Everything we do at the American Egg Board is designed to meet consumers where they are and is derived from data and insights. As far as the consumer is concerned, sustainability, animal welfare and purpose-driven production are the new table stakes in the food industry — comparable to traditional product benefits like quality, nutritional value and affordability. Hema Prado has the experience and expertise to lead the research and education programs that will support the egg industry and its customers in telling this important production and environmental story and innovating around these values — securing the consumer’s trust and assuring prosperity for future generations of U.S. egg farmers,” said AEB President & CEO Emily Metz.

According to Ketchum Analytics’ Brand Reckoning 2020 study, most Americans (51%) now define sustainability as the “ability to produce and provide food to people responsibly, in ways that protect people and the planet and ensure food is available when people want and need it.” Moreover, since the COVID-19 pandemic began, three-fourths of Americans associate sustainability with safety (77%); recyclable/reusable packaging (77%); economic viability of food production (76%); less food waste (76%); and environmental protection (75%).

The AEB’s new program under Prado has a broad directive focused on bringing greater clarity and scientific rigor to bear across a host of key issues in the environmental and sustainability fields, as well as in animal welfare and workforce and social responsibility. The program aims to work closely with multiple stakeholders within and outside of the egg industry, including governmental agencies, NGOs and broader agriculture, to establish industry-level metrics and data, and to arm producers, retailers, foodservice and manufacturers with a definitive and comprehensive source of objective information about U.S. egg production. The new program will also be fully integrated with the AEB’s Food Chain Outreach function working to forge relationships with food industry thought leaders in these important areas.

“The issues we plan to address are complex. Sustainability entails everything from responsible environmental stewardship to animal welfare to food waste and much more. The solutions will require a big tent. I’m looking forward to engaging and partnering with our egg industry and agriculture stakeholders, our customers and parties outside of the industry — including environmental groups, technologists and thought leaders — to develop proactive, scientifically sound and rigorous solutions to the challenges we face,” said Prado.

“At the end of the day, we hope to not only prescribe how to effect and measure continuous on-farm improvement, but also to provide our partners in retail, foodservice and manufacturing with the data and tools they need to track and forecast the industry’s progress and drive their own decisions,” Prado added.

Prado will support a key focus outlined in the AEB’s new strategic vision and five-year plan: industry efforts to advance the science that measures on-farm continuous improvement in the areas of sustainability, hen care and other purpose-driven production metrics, as well as enhance understanding of the role of eggs in sustainable food and agricultural systems.

Prado will also focus on partnering with the industry to drive continuous improvement and work to align that improvement to downstream sustainability goals. To that end, the AEB is working in lockstep partnership with egg industry trade association United Egg Producers (UEP) across industry initiatives on multiple fronts, including on the egg industry’s most comprehensive lifecycle assessment to date, conducted in partnership with the Egg Industry Center located at Iowa State University. The AEB and UEP are also both members of the multi-stakeholder U.S. Roundtable for Sustainable Poultry & Eggs and the International Poultry Welfare Alliance.

Prado joins the AEB from EPA, where she was most recently senior advisor for agriculture in the Office of the Administrator, and previously worked on regulatory and voluntary programs related to animal agriculture, pesticides, and water quality. Prado helped transform EPA’s relationships with agriculture beyond the regulatory box to becoming a partner and technical resource for the food supply chain around shared environmental goals. Prado also had several previous years of experience at nonprofits, including as director of an international program to bring medicine and nutrition to children in remote rural villages at Progressive Health Worldwide and an analyst on agricultural and toxics issues at Environmental Working Group. Prado has an M.S. in Environmental Management from University of Maryland University College and a B.A. in Environmental Studies and Psychology from Pitzer College.

About the American Egg Board (AEB)

Home of the Incredible Egg, the AEB is the U.S. egg industry’s national commodity marketing organization. The AEB’s mission is to increase demand for eggs and egg products through research, education and promotion. The AEB is located in Chicago, Ill. For more, visit IncredibleEgg.org

America’s Egg Farmers Issue TikTok #EggDishChallenge with Celebrity Chef & TV Host Chef Lovely to Help Local Restaurants Rebound from Pandemic

America’s Egg Farmers Issue TikTok #EggDishChallenge with Celebrity Chef & TV Host Chef Lovely to Help Local Restaurants Rebound from Pandemic

New Data Reveals One in Four Americans is Eating More Eggs Post-Pandemic, Offering Restaurants Impacted by Shutdowns New Opportunities to Attract and Delight Diners

(CHICAGO) June 22, 2021 As the nation emerges from pandemic shutdowns and capacity limits, local restaurants around the country are getting an eggstra boost from a popular menu mainstay — the incredible egg — and a healthy dose of hometown competition. Igniting America’s passion for eating out, the American Egg Board (AEB) has partnered with celebrity chef Connie Lovely Jackson, aka Chef Lovely, and influencers across the country to showcase eggceptional dishes at their favorite local restaurants on TikTok in the nation’s first #EggDishChallenge. To further help local restaurants rebound, the AEB is donating $10,000 each to ten selected restaurants across the country.

Experience the interactive Multichannel News Release here: https://www.multivu.com/players/English/8908151-american-egg-board-partners-chef-lovely-restaurants-pandemic-eggdishchallenge-initiative/ 

Now through Tuesday, July 6, noteworthy food influencers will create and share videos taken inside local restaurants, championing their pick for the best egg dish in their city and challenging their followers to do the same. Every restaurant tagged in a TikTok with the #EggDishChallenge hashtag will be entered for a chance to receive one of ten $10,000 donations to help that winning restaurant with post-pandemic improvements. Chef Lovely will help choose the top 10 deserving restaurants.

“I’ve connected with many people who spent the last year inside their homes trying new ways to cook up eggs, but it’s time to get out! It is more important than ever to inspire diners to safely return to their local restaurants and celebrate the incredible creations on those menus,” said Chef Lovely. “I’m eggcited to team up with America’s egg farmers on this TikTok challenge to get Americans back into restaurants and try some new, lovely egg dishes they may not be able to create in their own kitchens.”

Restaurants were one of the hardest hit industries throughout the pandemic and consumers are looking for new ways to help restaurants recover. In a recent nationwide survey*, 76% of Americans said they are willing to take both drastic and reasonable measures to help their favorite local restaurant stay in business, ranging from buying breakfast for their entire neighborhood to eating out with a friend once a month. The same survey also notes that one in four Americans is eating more eggs since the pandemic started — that number is even higher for those 18-54 years old — providing additional opportunities for restaurants to make eggs a part of their rebound.

The survey also revealed some surprising findings on how restaurant goers are enjoying their eggs across the country, including:

  • Of adventurous eaters who tried new egg dishes in the last year, nearly half tried huevos rancheros, a quarter tried chilaquiles and 1 in 5 has tried either tortilla Espanola or bibimbap.
  • Omelets are the favorite egg dish to order when eating out, with breakfast tacos, Benedicts, egg salad sandwiches, Mexican skillets and cobb salads rounding out the top six.
  • Women are more likely than men to order healthier egg dishes, including avocado toast (17% vs 11%) and a cobb salad (22% vs 14%); and men are more likely than women to order a breakfast pizza (16% vs 10%) and a fried egg burger (18% vs 12%).
  • Tastebuds differ regionally! Houstonians order more likely to order breakfast tacos while eating out than people in other cities, while New Yorkers order an egg salad sandwich 10% more than the national average.
  • Los Angeles and Minneapolis have the most adventurous eaters, and egg eaters in both cities are more likely to say their favorite restaurant prepares eggs better than they do at home.
  • More than a third of Seattleites say “put an egg on it!” when ordering ramen, and believe the dish is made better topped with an egg.

“Now that the country is reopening, it’s time to support our local restaurants in their great comeback. Whether you’re ordering classic favorites like the omelet or eggs Benedict, perfectly pairing an egg on a salad or burger, or trying a new-to-you dish like a bibimbap or tortillas Española, there are countless ways to love eggs at your local restaurants,” said Emily Metz, president and CEO of the American Egg Board. “The only thing better than enjoying an incredible egg dish while dining out is knowing you’re helping America’s restaurants at the same time. We can’t wait to see what these influencers and their followers are ordering and to uncover the best egg dishes across America!”

For more information on additional ways the AEB is supporting local restaurants in the post-pandemic recovery, visit IncredibleEgg.org.

About Connie Lovely Jackson ‘Chef Lovely’ @cheflovely

Home of the Incredible Egg, the AEB is the U.S. egg industry’s national commodity marketing organization. The AEB’s mission is to increase demand for eggs and egg products through research, education and promotion. The AEB is located in Chicago, Ill. For more, visit IncredibleEgg.org

About the American Egg Board (AEB)

Home of the Incredible Egg, the AEB is the U.S. egg industry’s national commodity marketing organization. The AEB’s mission is to increase demand for eggs and egg products through research, education and promotion. The AEB is located in Chicago, Ill. For more, visit IncredibleEgg.org

* The American Egg Board partnered with research firm YouGov to survey 1,454 nationally representative US adults, ages 18+, through YouGov’s omnibus. The survey was fielded online from June 2-3, 2021, with a margin of error of +/- 3% at 95% confidence.

Egg Dish Challenge

Our TikTok stars have put egg dishes back on the map.

Click an influencer’s name to view their #EggDishChallenge submissions on TikTok!

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American Egg Board Unveils New ‘Brunch for Lunch’ Menu, Featuring Real School Meals

American Egg Board Unveils New ‘Brunch for Lunch’ Menu, Featuring Real School Meals

5 Days / 5 Ways® Program Provides Kid-Approved Ideas for National School Lunch Week 2021

CHICAGO (May 11, 2021) — To support school nutrition directors preparing for National School Lunch Week Oct. 11-15, the American Egg Board (AEB) has released the next 5 Days / 5 Ways® menu, featuring ‘Brunch for Lunch’ inspiration. 

From green avocado salsa to buffalo cauliflower, these five on-trend brunch recipes feature flavor kids get excited about, nutrition parents want to see, and the flexibility school nutrition teams need. All five recipes come from real school districts around the country and easily work for cafeteria service or as grab n’ go for the classroom.

“The Brunch for Lunch trend fits squarely into this year’s National School Lunch Week theme as students are wild about breakfast items served all day,” said Maribel Alchin, M.B.A., R.D.N., L.D.N., manager of marketing projects at the AEB. “With a versatile, affordable ingredient like eggs, school nutrition teams can unleash their untamed creativity to spark interest in the school lunch program as families begin to return to routine.”

 

The school districts featured in this menu include Whitesboro ISD, Texas; Urbandale SD, Iowa; Gretna SD, Nebraska; Cornwall Lebanon SD, Pennsylvania; and South Pasadena USD, California. To get the word out about these K-12 recipes, school nutrition directors can also find a library of marketing tools online from posters to social media posts — all designed to get parents and students engaged with school meals. 

Beyond marketing support, the AEB has curated a library of resources to make it easy for students to learn everything about eggs, which is perfect for Farm-to-School Month in October. From cooking videos to virtual farm field trips, educators can find lesson plans for every grade level, as well as information about the new 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which recommend eggs for children.

 

Find this Brunch for Lunch menu and more REAL support on how to menu and market eggs at www.incredibleegg.org/5Days5Ways.   

 

To request an interview or photos, please contact Bethany Bell at 815.398.6860 or bbell@quietlightcom.com.

 

     

About the American Egg Board (AEB)

Home of the Incredible Egg, the AEB is the U.S. egg industry’s national commodity marketing board. The AEB’s mission is to increase demand for eggs and egg products through research, education and promotion. The Egg Nutrition Center is the science and education division of the AEB. The AEB is located in Chicago, Ill. For more, visit www.incredibleegg.org.

About Eggs In Schools

Eggs In Schools is a program developed by the American Egg Board specifically for the K-12 segment. This program is designed to provide school nutrition directors with real school recipes, kid-approved menu inspiration featuring eggs and to give educators resources to teach students all about the nutritional value of eggs. For more info and online resources on how to make, menu and market eggs, visit incredibleegg.org/professionals/k-12-schools/.

 

American Egg Board Names Mike Hostetler Director of Consumer Insights

American Egg Board Names Mike Hostetler Director of Consumer Insights

Insights leader to leverage background at major CPGs and brands to build egg industry’s first centralized consumer research and intelligence hub

(CHICAGO) April 19, 2021 The American Egg Board (AEB) today named Mike Hostetler to the newly created role of director of consumer insights. Reporting to VP Insights & Innovation Nate Hedtke, Hostetler will lead development of the AEB’s planned insights hub — a new integrated consumer, customer and egg industry research and intelligence center to support marketing, innovation and strategic initiatives at the industry level and increase demand for eggs and egg products.

An accomplished research, analytics and insights expert, Hostetler brings more than 15 years of food industry expertise and experience leading insight generation to identify innovation opportunities and inform brand strategy, positioning and communications at top CPGs, including Kellogg, McCormick & Co., Kraft Heinz and, most recently, Perdue.

“In this new era of rapid change, it is imperative that AEB’s knowledge and understanding of our egg consumer be unparalleled so that we are a resource to our members, industry and collaborators. Mike Hostetler has the experience, credentials and success record to help turn insights about evolving consumer needs, as well as cultural and market dynamics and trends, into actionable intelligence — enabling the AEB and the egg industry to quickly capitalize on emerging opportunities,” said AEB President & CEO Emily Metz.

A key goal in the AEB’s new strategic vision and five-year plan, the AEB will, for the first time, offer a comprehensive, industrywide insights hub as a resource for holistic insights generation. Hostetler will also lead development of the AEB’s learning plan, including developing a learning agenda for priorities laid out in the strategic plan, as well as creation of an enterprise-wide data analytics framework. Lastly, Hostetler will help develop the AEB’s industry newsroom — a real-time news and social media monitoring and response center.

Hostetler joins the AEB from Perdue Foods, where, as director of insights and analytics, he led consumer insights and analytics across all consumer business and was a member of Perdue’s marketing leadership team. Prior to Perdue, Hostetler held numerous insights & analytics roles with large CPG organizations, including The Kellogg Company, McCormick & Co. and The Kraft Heinz Company. He holds a BA in Actuarial Science from Butler University and an MBA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

About the American Egg Board (AEB)

Home of the Incredible Egg, the AEB is the U.S. egg industry’s national commodity marketing organization. The AEB’s mission is to increase demand for eggs and egg products through research, education and promotion. The AEB is located in Chicago, Ill. For more, visit IncredibleEgg.org

American Egg Board Unveils 44th Annual First Lady’s Commemorative Egg and Landmark Hunger Relief Pledge at Easter

AMERICAN EGG BOARD UNVEILS 44TH ANNUAL FIRST LADY’S COMMEMORATIVE EGG AND LANDMARK HUNGER RELIEF PLEDGE AT EASTER

America’s Egg Farmers Pledge Record-Breaking Donation of More Than 90 Million Eggs to Food Banks Across the Country This Year — Doubling 2020 Donations

CHICAGO (March 31, 2021) The American Egg Board (AEB) has unveiled the 2021 First Lady’s Commemorative Egg along with a historic pledge by America’s egg farmers to donate more than 90 million eggs this year to food banks across the country. The record-breaking commitment was shared in conjunction with the 44th annual presentation of the First Lady’s Commemorative Egg, a symbolic gift for Dr. Jill Biden and an Easter tradition on behalf of America’s egg farmers.

“For more than 40 years, the presentation of the First Lady’s Commemorative Egg by America’s egg farmers has been a cherished springtime tradition celebrating our nation’s first ladies. We are honored to continue that tradition with Dr. Biden this year by also pledging to donate more than 90 million eggs for hunger relief, sharing the Bidens’ commitment to serving those in need, at such a great time of need,” said Emily Metz, president and CEO of the American Egg Board.

Dating back to 1977, the First Lady’s Commemorative Egg celebrates the passions of America’s first ladies and their initiatives. Designed by master egg artist Russ Hagen, the 2021 First Lady’s Commemorative Egg features an image of the White House flanked by the iconic flowering cherry blossoms of our nation’s capital, reflecting the spirit of hope and renewal inherent to spring and American optimism.

“While eggs are in demand all year round — especially at our nation’s food banks — they are the cornerstone of spring celebrations around Easter and Passover, and America’s egg farmers are especially proud of the egg’s prominent place on Americans’ tables during these special celebrations,” said Metz. “We want to make sure everyone can enjoy the versatility and nutrition of eggs. Eggs provide a complete source of high-quality protein and other important nutrients that growing children and people of all ages need, and America’s egg farmers are committed to making sure every family has access to eggs.”

Today, more than 45 million Americans, including 15 million children, may experience food insecurity, according to Feeding America’s The Impact of the Coronavirus on Food Insecurity in 2020 & 2021 brief. U.S. egg farmers have long supported families in need through egg and egg product donations, and their dedication only continues to grow.

In 2021, America’s egg farmers pledge to:

  • Support American families facing food insecurity by encouraging equitable access to sustainable nutrition.
  • Donate more than 90 million eggs — doubling 2020 donations — directly from farms to food banks in the wake of COVID-19.
  • Provide wholesome, nutritious eggs with powerful nutrients to people of all ages.

On behalf of America’s egg farmers, the AEB encourages Americans to spread hope this spring by supporting their community and contacting their local food pantry to determine how they, too, can join the fight against hunger today.

About the First Lady’s Commemorative Egg
For photos and history about the First Lady’s Commemorative Egg, Easter facts, egg decorating tips and recipe ideas, please visit IncredibleEgg.org. To join America’s egg farmers in fighting food insecurity, find your local food bank and ways to help at IncredibleEgg.org/GoodEggs.

About the American Egg Board (AEB)
Home of The Incredible Egg, the American Egg Board (AEB) is the national marketing organization of America’s egg farmers. AEB’s mission is to increase demand for eggs and egg products through research, education and promotion. AEB is located in Chicago. For more, visit IncredibleEgg.org.

American Egg Board installs new 2021 Members and Alternates

Newly Appointed Members and Alternates for the American Egg Board Commence Two-Year Service Term

Eighteen egg farmers from across the country join returning members to lead national egg marketing checkoff program to drive demand for eggs and egg products

(CHICAGO) March 17, 2021 Nine newly appointed members and nine alternates representing egg farmers across the country were officially installed at today’s annual meeting of the American Egg Board, starting their service on behalf of America’s egg farmers and the entire egg industry.

Appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture earlier this year, the appointees will serve two-year terms ending March 2023. The American Egg Board is comprised of 18 members and 18 alternates and represents the interests of all U.S. egg farmers. Appointments originate through a nominating process from three geographic areas across the United States and reflect the national composition of AEB membership.

“The leadership, guidance and active participation of our nation’s egg farmers are crucial to fulfilling the American Egg Board’s mission to drive demand for eggs and egg products, and I am eager to work with our new board appointees from across the country as we implement our ambitious new five-year strategic plan,” said Emily Metz, president and CEO of the American Egg Board. “As our newly appointed members and alternates took their oath of office this afternoon, I was again struck by the dedication and commitment of these hard-working men and women to further America’s egg industry on behalf of all egg farmers.”

Newly appointed American Egg Board members and alternates are:

East States

  • Lake Wagner, Abingdon, Virginia, member
  • Keith H. Berry, Silverstreet, South Carolina, alternate member
  • Chris Esbenshade, Lititz, Pennsylvania, member
  • Khalee Kreider, Manheim, Pennsylvania, alternate member
  • Gijs Schimmel, Lexington, Georgia, member
  • Elliot Gibber, New York, New York, alternate member

Central States

  • Mindy Creighton Truex, Warsaw, Indiana, member
  • Sean Delano, Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, alternate member
  • Jeffrey Cutler, Columbus, Indiana, member
  • Ted Greidanus, Centerton, Arkansas, alternate member
  • Robert Gornichec, Centerburg, Ohio, member
  • Ben Thompson, Pearl City, Illinois, alternate member
  • Tim Vande Bunte, Holland, Michigan, member
  • Thomas Edward Hertzfeld III, Whitehouse, Ohio, alternate member

West States

  • Anthony Demler, Ramona, California, member
  • Tracy Ramsdell, Flandreau, South Dakota, alternate member
  • Bruce L. Dooyema, Sioux Center, Louisiana, member
  • Terry L. Baker, Wakefield, Nebraska, alternate member

And, with appreciation and thanks for their service, those members and alternates rotating off included:

  • Stephen Herbruck, Saranac, Michigan, member
  • Evan Lathem, Pendergrass, Georgia, alternate
  • Jason Ramsdell, Flandreau, South Dakota, alternate

Allison Holker-Boss Hosts First-Ever Incredible Egg Challenge, Inspiring Tastemakers to Create the Ultimate Easter Celebrations – AEB Press Release

First-Ever Incredible Egg Challenge

Allison Holker-Boss Hosts First-Ever Incredible Egg Challenge, Inspiring Tastemakers to Create the Ultimate Easter Celebrations
Competition to inspire bakers, entertainers, cooks and crafters to get eggstra creative this spring

CHICAGO (Mar. 9, 2021) – The Incredible Egg Challenge, hosted by So You Think You Can Dance All-Star, television host, professional dancer and choreographer Allison Holker-Boss, kicks off today, beginning a three-week competition to highlight participating challengers’ creativity with eggs. The competition, in partnership with the American Egg Board, will feature the best in baking, cooking, crafting, entertaining and design — all with eggs — as challengers battle it out for the prized “Golden Egg” and donation to the hunger-relief charity of their choice.

From creating magnificent desserts and spring-inspired dishes to designing the ultimate Easter décor, three noteworthy tastemakers including culinary expert Jocelyn Delk Adams, DIY crafting expert Kelly Mindell and home décor star Ashley Rose will compete for the best egg creations over the next several weeks before the holiday. 

“Easter is the ultimate egg holiday, so I’m thrilled to be partnering on The Incredible Egg Challenge this year,” said Allison Holker-Boss. “Eggs have endless possibilities. I love to incorporate them into both my holiday recipes and décor — and I can’t wait to see how our challengers bring this special season to life in their own unique ways!” 

“America’s egg farmers put the eggs in Easter and I can’t wait to see what incredible dishes, decor and crafts these creative challengers whip up,” added Emily Metz, president and CEO of the American Egg Board. “As our challengers know, with eggs, the possibilities are endless, and I can’t wait to see what they create to celebrate the season!”

Throughout the three weeks of The Incredible Egg Challenge, the public will have the chance to vote for their favorite weekly egg creations and creators. Today, the first week’s Marvelous Meringue challenge is live. Beginning March 17, Holker-Boss will challenge participants to create their best egg-forward Holiday Brunch Board. The third and final weekly challenge will launch on March 24 and be focused on decorating. The public can vote for their favorite egg creations by visiting www.IncredibleEgg.org/Challenge

Culminating just prior to Easter on March 30, the fan-favorite challenger will be named the winner of The Incredible Egg Challenge and receive the “Golden Egg Grand Prize:” monthly breakfast for a year at a local restaurant and a $5,000 donation to the hunger-relief charity organization of their choice. 

“We hope everyone is inspired to explore fresh, new ways to celebrate this season by decorating, creating beautiful spring treats, or doing some family-friendly crafts…all with eggs as the inspiration. After all, what’s Easter without eggs?” said Metz.

To follow along with the fun and vote for your favorite egg creations, visit www.IncredibleEgg.org/Challenge. Feeling inspired? Share your best Easter designs by tagging @incredibleegg in your creations and using #TheIncredibleEggChallenge.

About the American Egg Board (AEB) 

Home of The Incredible Egg, the American Egg Board (AEB) is the national marketing organization of America’s egg farmers. The AEB’s mission is to increase demand for eggs and egg products through research, education and promotion. The AEB is located in Chicago, Ill. For more, visit IncredibleEgg.org.